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    Slot vs. Trench Drains: The Right Option for Food Facilities

    The sanitation of a food processing facility is a priority, no matter what you’re packaging or manufacturing. Having to decide on the proper drainage method to remove liquid and debris to prevent bacterial buildup is a big part of the equation.

    Typically, your choices are between a slot and trench drain, and finding the right option for your food facility depends on the specific uses of each and what your plant requires.

    What Is a Trench Drain?

    Trench drains are floor drains in the form of a trough with a slotted grate; they prevent any large objects from entering and blocking the drain. The troughs slope downward to direct liquids and small debris into a catch basin, with a second strainer to catch larger objects. From there, the waste travels to a sewage system.

    When To Use a Trench Drain

    Facilities that have high-capacity drainage or need to remove smaller solid objects would do well with a trench drain. Since the grates have larger openings and the drain channel has a wider opening, they let large volumes of waste pass through without clogging to eliminate standing water and bacteria.

    What Is a Slot Drain?

    When you’re comparing slot to trench drains, the right option for your food facility is often a linear slot drain. For areas that have safety hazards like pathogens and bacteria, slot drains are a great choice. They’re usually made from stainless steel, so caustic cleaners used to kill pathogens won’t damage or corrode them. And unlike trench drains, slot drains don’t have grate covers, so they can easily withstand heavy traffic.

    When To Use a Slot Drain

    Usually, slot drains are preferred over trench drains, but both options work in food facilities. However, slot drains are ideal because they only require sloped flooring, which offers more adaptability for your plant and is more ergonomic for your staff. Plus, they work well under pressure from machinery like forklifts.

    Contact Standartpark to discuss the pros and cons of trench and slot drains. We’ll answer all your questions to help you select the best drainage option for your facility.

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